September – a good time to holiday

Detail from photographic portrait of Charles D...

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Those people who don’t like the crowds, or the heat or don’t have children often choose to holiday in September.  Everything gets a little bit cheaper and the holiday destinations less frenetic.  I heartily recommend it.

Charles Dickens was an early proponent of the September holiday. As early as 1837 he spent September in Broadstairs which he returned to time and time again.

He leaves an interesting account of the young visitors to the resort.

So many children are brought down to our watering-place that, when they are not out of doors, as they usually are in fine weather, it is wonderful where they are put: the whole village seeming much too small to hold them under cover.  In the afternoons, you see no end of salt and sandy little boots drying on upper window-sills.  At bathing-time in the morning, the little bay re-echoes with every shrill variety of shriek and splash — after which, if the weather be at all fresh, the sands teem with small blue mottled legs. The sands are the children’s great resort. They cluster there, like ants: so busy burying their particular friends, and making castles with infinite labour which the next tide overthrows, that it is curious to consider how their play, to the music of the sea, foreshadows the realities of their after lives.

Broadstairs remained one of Dickens’ favourite holiday places but he also travelled further afield.  In 1844 he took his whole family in what must have resembled a caravan around France and Italy.  He stayed at two villas for the last six months of the year.

Even then, it was wonderful to be a writer.

 

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About Martin Lake

Martin Lake lives in the French Riviera with his wife. After studying at the University of East Anglia he worked as a teacher, trainer and company director. A serious accident shattered his arm and meant that he had to rein back his work. He decided to concentrate on writing and is now writing full-time. He writes a wide range of fiction. His main interests are historical fiction, short stories and fiction for young adults. Martin has a series of novels 'The Lost King' which are set in the years following the Norman Invasion of England. They concern Edgar Atheling, last representative of the ancient English royal dynasty and his fight to regain the throne from William the Conqueror. Martin has also published 'Artful' the further adventures of the Dodger and 'Outcasts' a novel about fall of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem. His latest novel, 'A Love Most Dangerous' is about a maid of honour who becomes the lover of Henry VIII. Martin’s work has been broadcast on radio. He won first prize in the Kenneth Grahame Society competition to write a story based on 'The Wind in the Willows.' You can get the collection, 'The Wind in the Willows Short Stories' from Amazon.
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